Hotel Del Coronado

With a unparalleled seaside setting and exquisite architecture, the Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego is one of the most gigantic and incredible places we’ve ever seen. Built in 1888, it was the largest resort in the world at the time it was built.

 “When the hotel first opened we had what was called the American Plan, which meant all of your meals were included,” hotel historian Gina Petrone told Forbes magazine. “Room rates started at $2 to $2.50 per day, and guests attending a special dinner in the Crown Room in 1893 could enjoy a pint of Veuve Clicquot for just $2.50. Also, the resort once had a separate dining room and a separate entrance for single women.”

The hotel was also home to the first outdoor electric Christmas tree in 1904, and its home to two of the original prints of “I Dreamed I was a Doorman at The Del” that Dr. Seuss painted, Forbes reported.

Gorgeous, historic and some ghosties, too! “For those interested in more of the supernatural guests of the hotel, the world’s most infamous ghost lives in room 3327,” said the Forbes story. “‘A woman named Kate Morgan stayed here in 1892 and kept asking for her brother,” says Petrone. ‘A few days later she shot herself, and no one claimed the body, so she got the name Beautiful Stranger. To this day people still report sightings. In fact, a man a couple of months ago asked to be moved when his suitcase contents were strewn about the room while he was in the bathroom.’”

Marilyn Monroe also filmed “Some Like it Hot” here in 1958. Famous guests have included Oprah Winfrey, Jack Nicholson, Ellen DeGeneres to Cary Grant, Burt Lancaster and Katherine Hepburn.

According to Travel and Leisure, Frank Baum, the author of “The Wizard of Oz” designed the chandeliers still hanging in the Crown Room, basing them on the the crown worn by the Cowardly Lion. Liberace was discovered while playing in the lobby for a small group.

Deemed a National Historic Landmark in 1977, its lobby has been restored to its original charm, and the front desk has been replicated to reflect the original 1888 piece.

Visit our Instagram account for an array of photos, including more interior pics.

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