Deacon Braddock Dimmick House

Built in 1804, this beauty in Falmouth, Mass., comes with an amazing history that includes a deacon, a doctor, the “Cranberry King” and allegedly a whole lotta ghosts, too.

Its original owner, Deacon Braddock Dimmick, (1761-1845) was a respected town father, serving as an officer of the church, town selectman and clerk treasurer, State Senator, and Representative to the Court. His father, General Joseph Dimmick, had been active in the Revolutionary War defense of Falmouth, also in the War of 1812.

Later, John H. Crocker — known locally as the “Cranberry King” — lived here. Crocker, who owned cranberry bogs in East Falmouth beginning in 1885, became one of the wealthiest and influential men in Falmouth, and a stalwart in groups such as the Gentleman’s Driving Club at Totten Park.

40 Main St. Falmouth

Is there a doctor in the house? Two of ’em, in fact. Dr. Edwin Tripp, and his son Dr Edwin Tripp, Jr., also lived here, with the residence serving additionally as medical offices for a time.

The house made a short-lived run as an inn, and after a gut and restoration job, became luxury condos. But rumour has it that more than one previous resident still lurks here.

A specter of a stooped man in a flannel shirt rumored to be Dr. Tripp has reportedly been seen here. And a teenage girl, Sarah, who died here in 1823, allegedly peers from second story window and hovered over sleeping guests when the place was an inn. In typical ghost form, she is wearing an old-fashioned white nightgown.

At any rate, of these stories make the statue head sitting on the third floor windowsill creepy AF, no?

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